Every New Car Coming To Singapore In 2019




Every new car coming to Singapore in 2019 is right here. CarBuyer tells you the what, when, how much, and how much of a damn to give

Text: CarBuyer Team
Photos: Manufacturers

SINGAPORE –

CarBuyer’s collated a list of every new car launching here in Singapore this year. Click on the brand link below to jump straight to it. 

Alfa Romeo

Alpina

Aston Martin

Audi

Bentley

BMW

Citroen / DS

Ferrari

Ford

Honda

Hyundai

Infiniti

Jaguar

Jeep

Land Rover /
Range Rover

Lexus
Kia

Mercedes-Benz

Mini

Nissan

Lamborghini

Maserati

McLaren

Peugeot

Renault

Rolls-Royce

Seat

Suzuki

Mazda

Porsche

Skoda

Subaru

Toyota

Volkswagen

Volvo

Alfa Romeo

What: Stelvio

When: Jan 2019

How much: From $228,000 with COE

Back in November, we reported on CarBuyer.com.sg that the Stelvio, Alfa Romeo’s first SUV, had made its local debut but was available for pre-orders only. Well, now that it’s completed the Land Transport Authority’s homologation process, sales can actually begin. The base Stelvio Super has a 2.0-litre turbo-four with 200hp, and it’s joined by the Stelvio Super, with a 280hp version of the same engine, as well as the 510hp 2.9L twin-turbo V6 Stelvio Quadrifoglio, which is currently the world’s fastest SUV around the Nurburgring. In true Alfa tradition though, even the 2.0-litre models should be great to drive, thanks to aluminium construction and 50/50 weight distribution.

Alpina

What: B5 Biturbo Touring

When: 2019

How much: TBA

BMW has stopped making M station wagons  so it’s now up to the B5 Biturbo Touring to continue its fight against Audi’s RS 6 Avant and Mercedes-AMG’s E 63 S estate. Alpina’s load-lugging B5’s bi-turbo V8 produces a storming 608hp and 800Nm, and the all-wheel-driven estate will demolish the 100km/h sprint from standstill in just 3.7 seconds as it blitzes its way to a 322km/h top speed. It may not have the current M5’s ‘M xDrive’, which can be toggled between all- and rear-wheel drive modes, but the Alpina proves that four-wheel-drive can also be fun-wheel-drive, as it features Integral Active Steering for your driving pleasure, which results in ‘virtual’ short wheelbase handling traits: sharp and snappy.

Aston Martin

What: DBS Superleggera

When: January 2019

How much: POA
Aston’s more powerful, sporting grand tourer is for those who want V12 power but with a keener edge. It’s the same 5.2-litre biturbo V12 as found in the DB11, but with more oomph: 715hp, 900Nm of torque, 0-100km/h in 3.4 seconds, with a 338km/h top speed. Lavish carbonfibre bodywork, more aero, sharper dynamics – Aston is pitching this as a rival to Ferrari’s 812 Superfast. Which also means your credit with DBS has to be very, very good to have a chance of owning one.

Audi

What: A1 Sportback

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

Audi’s compact lux-hatch still has the segment mostly to itself, but a comprehensive improvement never hurts either. Like we saw with the VW Polo in 2018, switching to MQB brings a raft of new equipment and all-round improvements: active safety, new infotainment, new engines (possible for us: 95hp and 115hp 1.0-litre, 150hp 1.5-litre, or less likely 2.0-litre). As always, our news story has plenty more details for you.   

What: A4 and A4 Avant facelift

When: January 2019

How much: TBA

The A4 sedan gets its mid-life facelift, and this one’s really mild, with the usual new paint colours, tweaks to the car’s face and rear, and there are no major mechanical changes, so expect the same offerings as engines go: 2.0-litre with 190hp ‘ultra’ efficient model or 25H2p quattro model, and 3.0-litre with 354hp in the S4.

What: A6

When: Q1 2019

How much: TBA

Audi’s A6 has already appeared at the Singapore Motorshow. To date, only the 340hp, 3.0-litre quattro model – which we’ve test driven – has been confirmed for Singapore, since it’s the sole gasoline variant thus far. Expect great drivability, a high tech interior and the slew of new Audi-things we’ve already seen in the A8, Q8, and A7 Sportback.

What: Q3

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

With the debut of the cheaper and not-that-much-smaller-at-all Q2, the Q3 fell between the cracks a little in Audi’s range. No more, as the new Q3 upsizes with, you guessed it, MQB technology, so now it’s larger than the Q2 but smaller and less price-intimidating than the Q5 is. Of course what most buyers will care about is the gigantic diamond shaped grille and high-riding posture, but we’ve summed up all the new goodies here, and it’s been previewed in the flesh at the Singapore Motorshow 2019. 

What: TT Coupe, Cabriolet facelift  

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

The current TT was last fondled by us in light, fun, 1.8-litre guise, but the mid-life mark means a typical nip-n-tuck for Audi’s design icon, in both coupe and cabriolet form. The lower end of the front is where the action is (see the silver side vents and more), while under the bonnet the same 2.0-litre turbo engine makes a tad more power, and it’s also paired to a seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox (up from six previously).

What: e-tron

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

We’ve already covered Audi’s Tesla and Mercedes-Benz EQC challenger in depth on CarBuyer, having had the chance to poke its Audi executives’ brains on the challenges of EVs in Singapore, as well as having test driven it in the desert of Abu Dhabi just last month. With a claimed 400km plus range and plenty of power, it looks to help properly kick off the luxury charge of EVs in 2019.  

Bentley

What: Continental GT Convertible

When: Q3 2019

How much: TBA

Like its Coupe counterpart, the Continental GT Convertible reinterprets classical Bentley design cues for the modern palate. In Convertible guise, it’s possible to enjoy wind-in-hair motoring with the top down in the sumptuously appointed grand tourer, complete with rousing W12 soundtrack. The Active all-wheel drivetrain is calibrated to maintain grip in inclement conditions, but in ‘Bentley’ or ‘Sport’ driving modes, the going gets fast as you bring the might of its 635hp/900Nm to bear.


BMW

What: 1 Series

When: Q4 2019

How much: From S$130,000 with COE (estimated)

We don’t know what it’ll look like yet (the current model is shown here), but an all-new 1 Series shows its face next year and hits our shores at the tail end of 2019. It’s a radical, ground-up rethink of what a five-door BMW hatchback should be, and makes the switch to front-wheel drive. This will free up space in the back for passengers and a bigger boot, and add practicality, as will an overall size increase. BMW will probably lighten the car, since the current one is relatively flabby at around 1.4 tonnes.

The new 1 Series will sit on a platform that supersedes the UKL architecture currently underpinning the other front-drive BMWs (the 2 Series Active Tourer, Gran Tourer and X2) and all the Minis. No engine details are out yet of course, but the 102hp, 1.5-litre, 7-speed twin-clutch setup that powers the Mini One would help the new 1 Series mount a serious challenge to the formidable Mercedes A-Class here. Further up the range, expect a new M140i to debut possibly in 2020, but this time without six-cylinder power and, we’re guessing, around 340 horsepower under the bonnet.

What: 3 Series

When: April 2019

How much: S$210,000 with COE (estimated) for 330i

The bigger, better 3 Series swooped into the Singapore Motorshow in earlier this month, but will only be approved for sale here by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) in the second quarter of the year — before April if BMW is lucky.

It remains to be seen how many of the semi-autonomous and connectivity features that make the tech-laden new 3 Series so interesting find their way into Singapore cars, but the range will kick off with the 330i that we tested before. That’ll essentially be the mainstream hero model, but by July we’ll see an M340i with 374 hp and all-wheel drive roll in to tempt keen drivers. It hits 100km/h in 4.4 seconds.

That’s also when the plug-in 330e shows up, offering up to 60km of electric driving range and a motor system that can work with the 184hp 2.0-litre petrol to deliver short bursts of 292hp, enough to kiss 100km/h in 6.0 seconds flat. Not bad for an eco-friendly car.

That said, 3 Series sales won’t take off in earnest here until the 184hp 320i goes on sale. It only enters production mid-2019, so it’ll reach showrooms late next year at the earliest.

As usual for such an important model, CarBuyer has already spent time behind the wheel of the 330i and M340i. Also check out how the 3 Series ranks among the top executive sedans at the 2019 Singapore Motorshow.

What: 7 Series LCI (facelift)

When: Q3 2019

How much: From S$380,000 with COE (estimated) for 730i

The flagship BMW sedan gets a facelift next year (current model shown here), with the car appearing internationally in March and then making its way here. The third-quarter of the year is a safe bet for when the LTA approves it for sale.

The LCI exercise (for “life cycle impulse”) will see BMW give the 7 Series new controls inside, thus updating its flagship with the latest iDrive 7.0 system that made its debut on the new X5. Expect bigger, clearer, brighter displays for the cabin.

At the same time the 7 Series will get what are fairly major cosmetic updates to differentiate it from the 5 Series. The big, upright front grille from the X7 gives a hint at what the grand new face of the 7 Series will be like.

What: 8 Series Coupe

When: January 2019

How much: S$600,000 with COE (estimated) for M850i xDrive

BMW’s new super coupe was previewed here at BMW World in August, but made its proper debut at the Singapore Motorshow earlier this month. That hasn’t stopped dealer Performance Motors from quietly accepting “expressions of interest” from customers since then. We’ll find out how much it costs soon, but we’re guessing the M850i xDrive will list for a little under S$600,000 without the COE.

That money buys a plush four-seat coupe, but one with the legs to blitz to 100km/h in 3.7 seconds (!). For that you can thank the 530hp, 4.4-litre V8 engine and all-wheel drive. Big Dave has had a spin in the M850i already.

What: 8 Series Convertible

When: May 2019

How much: S$630,000 with COE (estimated) for M850i xDrive

While the new 8 Series is touted as a car that marries sportiness with comfort, this Convertible variant adds a dash of fun. It made its global debut at November’s Los Angeles auto show and has novelty value: last time there was a BMW 8 Series, there wasn’t a cabrio.

That said, a four-door 8 Series Gran Coupe is also in the works, so someone who wants a BMW with the number 8 on its boot is likely to be spoilt for choice. The real question many 8 Series fans will want answered is, when does a range of cheaper 840i models show up and take the price point under half a million dollars?

What: X5

When: January 2019

How much: More than S$350,00 with COE (estimated) for X5 xDrive40i

BMW’s big, segment-defining SUV made a return at the Singapore Motorshow with more rakish looks, sharper handling and more than a decent turn of speed — the xDrive40i model headed our way has 340hp and gets to 100km/h in just 5.5 seconds.

It retains the all-important seven-seat layout, but the new X5 isn’t utilitarian. The interior has been upgraded with posher materials and BMW’s iDrive 7.0 OS, and the air-suspension system on the car we tested back in September gave it a pillowy ride. It’s gone upmarket, in other words, and so much so that it’s a plausible alternative to BMW’s own 7 Series.

Our youngest staffer had a spin in the X5 in Atlanta, USA last year, and pronounced it a ‘well rounded package that really does mark the X spot’ in his review. Check out his quick review of the X5 at the 2019 Singapore Motorshow as well.

What: X7

When: May 2019

How much: More than S$600,00 with COE (estimated)

In some ways the BMW X7 is an elevated 7 Series, combining that car’s pinnacle status with the raised height and body shape of an SUV. The enormous double-kidney grille (the largest in the BMW range for now) gives the X7 a grand presence that should appeal to buyers who want something regal in the driveway. Pictures tend to make it look bulky, but in the flesh the X7’s footprint doesn’t look much larger than an X5’s.

The car comes with seven seats as standard, but the more upmarket option is to have six seats. “It’s not a bus,” Joerg Wunder, the project leader for the car, told CarBuyer. Why pay more for fewer seats? Because a 2-2-2 layout creates plush seating for the middle row — think of airlines that offer 2-2-2 seating in Business Class versus those that use a 2-3-2 layout.

Product planner Carsten Groeber told CarBuyer that the X7 was created because there was demand for such a car in the market, and until now BMW hasn’t taken advantage. It’ll be expensive, but the X7 does gives buyers something to think about other than a Mercedes-Benz GLS or high-end Range Rover. Plus, after you’ve had a string of 7 Series, you need somewhere higher to go.

The car was previewed at BMW World 2018 late last year along with the Z4 (below).

What: Z4

When: May 2019

How much: S$300,000 without COE for M40i

Two seats, rear-wheel drive and an open top — that’s the basic idea behind the BMW Z4 (always has been), but here the concept has been finely honed. For starters, the roof reverts to cloth (the previous model had a folding hard top), which makes the car much better to drive. The set-up up saves weight and, more importantly, lowers the centre of gravity.

There’s a stirring turbo six-cylinder in the M40i, too, which gives it 335hp and the ability to blitz to 100km/h in 4.6 seconds.

Our tester describes the chassis as “playful” after driving the Z4 on the track in October, but says the roadster isn’t uncomfortable. Two seats, rear-drive and so on might sound straightforward, but the new Z4 is likely to show that setup is everything.

Oh, and if you’re expecting a coupe model to show up, insiders tell us you shouldn’t hold your breath.

What: i3s (120Ah)

When: Q2 2019

How much: TBA

BMW’s battery-powered city car is a hoot to drive, and by mid-year the 184hp “s” version gets a bit more in the battery department with a bump in capacity from 94 amp-hours to 120Ah. That in turn raises the range to 246km (up from 200km or so), which translates to roughly an extra day of driving between recharging. To which we say, why not?

Citroen/DS

What: Citroen C5 Aircross

When: Q2 2019

How Much: TBA

What is the C5 Aircross? That’s easy – it’s a bigger version of the existing C3 Aircross. What’s a C3 Aircross? Uhhh…a crossover-y, multi-purpose-vehicle-y (MPV) thing. But who cares, that car proved surprisingly popular in Singapore with its uniquely Citroen spin on practicality and style, and the C5 might prove the same. Schedule for sale here with the 1.6-litre PureTech turbo engine with 180hp, it boasts new damper tech (Hydraulic Thrusts™and a super-flexible second row with three individual seats

What: DS 7 Crossback

When: January 10 2019 Singapore Motorshow

How much: TBA

PSA (Peugeot and Citroen’s parent) is cashing in on the EMP2 platform and crossover styling – the Pegueot 3008, 5008 and Citroen Aircross family are examples, while the new DS Automobiles DS 7 is another. It’s a mid-sized crossover with big ambitions, with DS pitching it as an upmarket, tech-heavy alternative to the usual (more expensive) German suspects. It does that with style and lots of cool stuff – slick LED lights, a novel adaptive ride system guided by cameras, a new-age cabin and more. Our variants will be powered by a 1.6-litre PureTech turbo inline 4 with 225hp – Find out how well it did in our Singapore Motorshow 2019 coverage of the best crossovers and stay tuned for our test drive very soon. 

Ferrari

What: 488 Pista/Pista Spider

When: 2019

How much: TBA

Ferrari’s special edition mid-engined rear-drive V8s are very special performance machines, in the least because they’re designed outperform the regular models on which they are based; in the case of the Pista and Pista Spider, it is the 488 GTB and 488 Spider respectively.

The engine, aerodynamics and handling are derived from Ferrari’s race-cars, the 488 Challenge and 488 GTE, and its turbocharged V8 heart is the brand’s most powerful yet, with 711hp and 770Nm on tap. Both Pista and the Pista Spider boast identical specifications, which see the 100km/h sprint from standstill dispatched in 2.85-seconds and a Fiorano lap time of 1:21.5.

Most intriguing is the Ferrari Dynamic Enhancer (FDE), which can be enjoyed by committed drivers in the ‘CT Off’ driving mode (or one level before all the stability nanny aids are completely disabled). With the FDE in play, the car’s oversteer traits are tuned to be progressive and predictable, so controlling it becomes intuitive even for advanced drivers, when otherwise it would have been under the strict purview of experienced professionals.

What’s it like? Big Dave has already tested the Pista coupe in Maranello, while the car has been previewed in Singapore in 2018 already – read the news and the review here!

Ford

What: Mustang facelift

When: Q1 2019

How much: $225,000 with COE (est)

For decades a forbidden fruit, yet recognisable worldwide due to its prominence in pop culture, the Ford Mustang finally went global in 2015. It received its first major update last year, although this facelift is only now reaching our shores. Under a 20mm-lower bonnet sits a 2.3-litre four-pot turbo (because the road tax on the V8 version is insane), with the same 312hp as before and a 40Nm increase in torque to 475Nm.

Honda

What: Accord

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

Call us traditional, but at CarBuyer, we remain big proponents of the good ol’ sedan body style, simply because they drive better. While the Honda Accord sounds like it might be more of the same, like the current Civic, it’s undergone a huge transformation.

Honda says the new Accord is a global model, so the one depicted here (a US model) is the same as that’s been previewed for sale in Thailand, Australia, and yes, it will be coming to Singapore too. You can see the new-look Honda lights – seen on the HR-V facelift – and face.


Large, naturally-aspirated engines have hobbled the big sedan class – we saw the 2.4-litre inline four become extinct in the past five years – which is why the Accord now packs a 1.5-litre turbo engine from the Civic. Initial figures stand at 190hp and 260Nm. The car is also significantly larger than before, stretching from 4,935mm long to 4,882mm, with a wheelbase increasing from 2,775mm to 2,830mm.

Another boost to its credentials is Honda Sensing, the range of active safety features that first appeared in Singapore with the facelifted Odyssey, and which will also be rolled out on various Honda models throughout the line-up.

Given the Accord was traditionally always the best-driving big, East Asian sedan around we have high hopes for the new one in 2019.

Hyundai

What: Avante

When: Now

How much: from $73,999 with COE

If you’re a fan of roti prata, perhaps this might be the next car for you, because its name seems to flip from one generation to the next. What was formerly the Elantra is now known again as the Avante, even though this is more an extensive facelift than a whole new car (the current Elantra was released in 2016).

It retains the 126hp 1.6-litre engine and six-speed auto from the Elantra, and gains a rear view camera, climate control, rear aircon vents and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto in its basic spec.

There will be three specifications: Base, S, and Elite. Features in higher-spec models include LED headlights, wireless smartphone charging, auto cruise control, ventilated front seats (with memory function for the driver), and blind spot detection.

What’s it like and which Avante to choose? Well CarBuyer has just tested it in both Avante Elite and Avante S forms, and tells you which is most worth the moolah.

What: i30 N

When: Now

How much: From $140k with COE

CarBuyer.com.sg broke the news of the Hyundai’s first hot hatch in Singapore in November 2018. The much awaited 250hp hot hatch version of the i30 seems to be the boy-racer choice of the near future, if only for the fact that is has a six-speed manual gearbox as standard (dual-clutch optional). Hyundai has also announced a i30 N version of its Fastback, though the availability of that car has yet to be confirmed.

What: Kona Electric

When: Singapore Motorshow 2019

How much: from $132k with COE

Electric vehicle tech is still pretty pricey, but if there’s one carmaker that’s going to democratise it, it’s probably Hyundai. The Kona Electric is its second EV after the Ioniq Electric, which is currently the cheapest EV available in Singapore. Hyundai makes two battery options for the Kona Electric, one rated at 39kwh and the other at 64kwh, though it’s not confirmed which one we’re getting. Respectively, that equates to outputs of 136/204hp; acceleration of 9.7/7.6 seconds; top speeds of 155/167km/h; and maximum ranges of 312/482km. Compared to the Ioniq, which has a 28kwh battery, the basic Kona will go about 70km longer on a single charge. The Kona Electric’s exterior mods are pretty much what you’d expect (blanked-off grille, special alloy wheels), but even the interior is substantially different, with a new double-decker centre console which has storage space beneath. The electric Kona was previewed at the Singapore Motorshow 2019. 

Infiniti

What: QX50

When: January 2019

How much: TBA

The QX50 is Infiniti’s first mid-sized premium crossover, a rival to the Mercedes GLC, BMW X3 and Volvo XC60. It was initially supposed to be launched late last year, but its homologation with the Land Transport Authority was delayed chiefly due to the never-before-seen engine tech it packs: the QX50 is the first ever production car to come with a variable combustion petrol engine.

Without getting too technical, basically what it can do is alter its compression ratio on the fly, continuously optimising the engine for power (high revs, low compression) or efficiency (low revs, high compression). Thus the 2.0-litre turbocharged VC-Turbo is claimed to provide the power of a big V6 (268hp), yet sipping fuel like a less powerful four-pot (7.8L/100km). ZOE TAY unveiled it at the Singapore Motorshow y’know. 

Jaguar

What: E-Pace facelift

When: Singapore Motorshow 2019

How much: From $180,000 with COE

Jaguar’s playful little cub, the E-Pace, was only launched last year so it’s not due any major updates just yet. For 2019 though, it does get a new engine option: a 200hp version of the 2.0-litre turbocharged Ingenium engine, to supplement the existing 250hp and 300hp variants. As expected, performance is slower (0-100km/h in 8.2 seconds and 216km/h flat-out), but then it’ll also be more affordable, at about $17,000 cheaper than the 250hp, thereby also undercutting its German rivals.

What: i-Pace

When: Singapore Motorshow 2019

How much: $400k (our estimate)

Cats are known to be stealthy hunters, and the Jaguar I-Pace might be the stealthiest, huntiest one there’s ever been. It’ll prowl along in absolute silence, because this is Jag’s first fully electric car. And most other traffic will be its prey, as it’s got one electric motor at each axle which gives all-wheel drive traction, and a 0-100km/h timing of 4.8 seconds. A total combined output of 400hp and 696Nm of torque, 50/50 weight distribution, front suspension out of an F-Type and the stiffest bodyshell Jaguar’s ever produced all make for the sportiest-driving EV around to day, and it’ll even cover 480km on a single charge to boot. This vehicle did not fare too shabbily in our round-up of the best green cars at the 2019 Singapore Motorshow.

Jeep

What: Wrangler JL

When: Q1 2019

How much: From $193,888 without COE

This icon of American motoring has gotten some significant updates under its heritage-laden exterior. The 3.6-litre V6 remains but gets slightly better fuel economy, thanks in part to the new eight-speed gearbox which replaces the old five-speeder, and there’s also the eTorque variant, a 270hp 2.0-litre mild hybrid (a first for a Jeep), which should make the Wrangler a lot more appealing to Singaporeans, along with the familiar 3.6-litre V6, and a 2.2-litre turbodiesel.

More significantly, the Wrangler gets more tech and creature comforts and a greatly modernised interior; a 7.0 or 8.4-inch infotainment unit with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, push-button start, blind spot monitoring and a backup camera being some of the highlights. As before, the Wrangler will be available in two-door and four-door Unlimited body styles. More details in our Weird n Wonderful Singapore Motorshow piece. 

What: Cherokee facelift

When: Q2 2019

How much: $178,888 without COE

For 2019, the Jeep Cherokee’s controversial squinty-eyed front styling makes way for something chunkier and more conventional. The rear end’s also been redone, with the number plate being relocated to the tailgate – now made of composite materials – which has increased boot space by 90 litres. The thirsty old 2.4L engine has also been sent packing, with the Wrangler’s 2.0L turbo now taking over propulsion duties. 270hp meets a 9-speed auto and four wheel drive, but it’s not confirmed if the engine will get the same mild hybrid setup as its more illustrious stablemate.

What: Renegade facelift

Variants: 1.4L turbo

When: 2nd Half 2019

How much: TBA

The adorable baby Jeep is also getting some updates. Externally there are new bumpers and wheels, but crucially also new LED lights (the old headlights were cheap-looking halogen unts). Interior changes are minor too, with additional storage spaces and the fact that the infotainment system gains Apple CarPlay/Android Auto connectivity.

Safety has also been improved, with lane departure warning and lane keep assist now being standard fitment. The big news for the Renegade overseas is the arrival of all-new three and four-cylinder engines, but details are murky for Singapore; Chrysler Jeep Singapore has stated that the existing 138hp 1.4-litre turbo will continue for now, together with a dual-clutch transmission (currently a six-speed auto is fitted), although a lighter, more efficient 1.3-litre with 150hp may be available at a later stage.

Kia

What: Niro

When: January

How much: S$109,999 with COE

Kia’s year kicks off with the relaunch of the Niro hybrid at the Singapore Motorshow. After giving its maker some strong sales numbers it was ushered out by stricter Vehicular Emissions Scheme (VES) standards, but has been tweaked by the factory to take its banding from a ruinous C1 (S$10,000 surcharge) to A2 (S$10,000). That S$20,000 swing in its final price should turn it back into a deserving strong-seller. It turned up in January as part of Team Green at the Singapore Motorshow 2019. 

What: Sportage (facelift)

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

Elsewhere the Sportage is a huge performer — it’s the global best-seller among Kia’s SUVs — but the latest model didn’t have much of a presence here despite being a very impressive piece of machinery, especially in GT Line form. Perhaps a facelift will change that, with restyled bumpers and new lamps helping to give the Nissan Qashqai fighter a snazzier face.

But what will really help is a smaller engine, with a 1.6-litre unit replacing the 2.0-litre that so hampered the Sportage’s chances first time around. Cycle & Carriage is working on getting the car in by the middle of 2019.

Lamborghini

What: Aventador SVJ Coupe

When: 2019

How much: TBA

When you’re told that slightly more than a handful of the S$2+m cars allocated for the Singapore market has been spoken for and there are still folks left wanting, it’s probably safe to say it’s a hit. The SVJ (for Superveloce Jota), an even more hardcore variant of the Aventador in both looks and performance, remains defiantly naturally-aspirated, with an evocative 6.5-litre V12 tweaked to deliver 760hp and 720Nm.


Lexus

What: RX facelift

When: Q4 2019

How much: TBA

The current-gen Lexus RX is nearing the middle of its model life-cycle, and a source in Borneo Motors has told us that its customary mid-life facelift will happen later this year, with a local launch expected towards the end of 2019. The RX’s update hasn’t been debuted globally yet though, so we have no details, but we’re expecting only minor revisions. That means the 2.0-litre turbo in the RX 300 and creamy-smooth 3.5-litre V6 in the RX 350 and seven-seat RX 350L will continue on, in conjunction with the usual mild updates to exterior styling, colours and interior trim.

What: UX

When: Singapore Motorshow 2019

How much: From $150,000 with COE

First and foremost the UX appeared at the Singapore Motorshow and was rated one of our top crossovers at Suntec. 

Lexus is going mini-me with its latest crossover, the UX. It slots below the existing NX, which was facelifted a year ago, and places a bit more emphasis on style, squaring up against the BMW X2, Mercedes GLA and Volvo XC40. It’s not as generous on space as other rivals, but it does have a likeable, easygoing character, as we found out at its launch in Sweden.

More significantly, the UX marks the first time Lexus will make big entrance into the small car arena – its previous entry was the CT 200h hybrid hatch which never really caught on both in Singapore and around the world, but the nice lines, and possibly nice price, of the UX will very likely turn that around 180.

As is the way with Lexus, the UX can be had with both hybrid or conventional petrol power, both based on the same 2.0-litre engine that’s closely related to the V6s in the flagship LS and LC Coupe.

The UX250h is slightly more powerful, and is claimed to return 4.1-4.3L/100km of fuel economy, but it’s the UX200 that’s probably going to be the volume seller. 171hp and 205Nm aren’t standout figures, but the UX200 does feature a new “Direct Shift” CVT, which incorporates a traditional torque converter and single gear for off-the-line acceleration, and helps reduce the CVT “rubber band acceleration” and makes the drivetrain feel more direct.

We’ve reported extensively on the UX from its global launch in Sweden and tell Singaporean buyers all they need to know about it, plus test drives of both UX 200 and UX 250h.

Mazda

What: Mazda 3 sedan and hatch

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

If we were to predict the hottest mainstream model of 2019, this would be it: The new Mazda 3. We’ve had tantalising, in-depth glimpses into the making of Mazda’s mainstream best-seller -from how it’s been designed to tweak your heartstrings, to packing a revolutionary new engine tech, Skyactiv-X, that combines the best bits of gasoline and diesel.

Previewed in the flesh at the LA Motorshow in late 2018 and Singapore being the second place in the world to get a peek, since it was previewed at the Singapore Motorshow 2019.

The new car is a real stunner, proving Mazda’s unorthodox design methods really do work.

Singapore will be getting 1.5 and 2.0-litre models, presumably with updated versions of the Skyactiv-G gasoline engines, but Mazda Singapore has yet to confirm if Skyactiv X models (only available in 2.0 for now) will be sold, but we think it’s certainly not out of the question.

The nitty-gritty is all TBA, but the switch to a new-gen everything – including the new infotainment system and second-gen Skyactiv platform – should ensure that the Mazda 3 is a front-runner even from the start.

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz A-Class Sedan Singapore

What: A-Class sedan (A-Class hatch shown here)

When: H1 2019

How much: TBA
Hot on the heels of the fourth-gen A-Class hatchback, which was launched here in November, comes the very first A-Class saloon. Considering the heritage of Mercedes-Benz, it’s surprising that it’s taken 20 years for a four-door A-Class to debut, but given that the new model family first broke cover in the form of the Concept A Sedan in 2017, it’s clear Mercedes intends to right that wrong.

Our report from June stirred up significant interest, and we figure it’s only increased since then, as Singapore is 1. Traditionally not a big hatchback market 2. The hatch is a little expensive and 3. A less costly A 180 sedan would sell like hotcakes.

Compared to the hatch, the A saloon is 130mm longer, which gives 50 litres more boot space, totalling 420 litres. Otherwise, everything forward of that should be the same, which means an all-new 1.33-litre engine with 163hp and cylinder shutdown technology in the A 200, a 224hp 2.0-litre engine in the A 250, and the new MBUX multimedia system, which is basically Mercedes’ version of Siri or Google Assistant. An A 180 is certainly a possibility given the ‘180’ variant of the B-Class has been announced (see next car).

What: B-Class

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

Take the neat new Mercedes A-Class, add a heavy dose of practicality, and this is what you end up with, the B-Class. As before, it’s a high-roofed, five-seat multi-purpose vehicle (MPV) although it’s been designed to look less boxy and upright than its predecessor. A 30mm stretch in wheelbase over the A-Class is the main difference in terms of hardware, which gives the B-Class roughly the same amount of interior space as previously, but the boot volume has shrunk slightly, to 455-litres.

It may not be the most practical amongst its mini-MPV peers like the BMW 2 Series Active Tourer, Renault Scenic and Volkswagen Sportsvan, but the B-Class is certainly the most posh, thanks to the fancy new twin-screen cockpit, light-up turbine-style aircon vents and MBUX system. Variants bound for Singapore are the B 180 and B 200, which use the new 1.33-litre four-pot, with either 136 or 163hp. How does it drive? Find out here on our international launch review.

What: CLA

When: H2 2019

The original CLA was a hit amongst Singaporean buyers, primarily because it was the cheapest way to get yourself a new three-box Mercedes-Benz; the company may have marketed it as a coupe, but the form-over-function connotations of that term were largely ignored by buyers. With a proper A-Class saloon now on the way though, the CLA will likely get the green light to become even lower, swoopier and sportier.


We say ‘likely’, because the new CLA hasn’t been revealed as of press time – its global debut is set for the Consumer Electronics Show on January 7 to 12, 2019, and a teaser shot is shown here. Expect mechanicals to be identical to the A-Class with CLA 200 and CLA 250 variants, as well as a CLA 35 AMG (mirroring the fantastic new A 35 AMG), and wagon-like CLA Shooting Brake further down the line.

What: G-Class
When: H1 2019

How much: At least $400k with COE

Whoever said that the only thing that will survive nuclear armageddon probably never encountered a Mercedes G-Class. Looking like a bank vault but built even sturdier, the G-Class is a bona fide icon, having soldiered on for four decades, albeit with significant revisions along the way. For 2019 though, the G-Class is all new, to make it easier to live with, yet leaves unchanged the things most loved by enthusiasts: the looks.

The new G-Class is bigger all round for much better interior space, yet also stiffer and lighter. New independent front suspension brings much-welcomed improvements to ride comfort and agility, and a switch to modern rack and pinion steering (instead of the old recirculating ball setup) allows you to properly steer the car, as opposed to offering it vague suggestions about where to go. The most obvious changes though, are found in the cabin, where the twin 12-inch display screens from the S-Class take centre stage.

What: GLC facelift

When: H2 2019

How Much: TBA

Just like the popular C-Class, which has been facelifted and was launched in Singapore just last month, so too is Mercedes’ equivalent-sized SUV, the GLC, getting its own update. It should still look very much like the current model, but the actual look hasn’t been unveiled yet, but spy shots indicate that it’ll follow a similar recipe as the C-Class. That involves head and tailights with different LED elements, as well as a larger infotainment screen (10.3-inch), digital instrument cluster (12-inch), and touch control steering wheel. The new rubberised touchpad from the A-Class also features in those shots, which indicate that the MBUX operating system might make also make an appearance.

Under the bonnet, the new GLC will probably also receive Mercedes’ new M264 four-cylinder engine, which has 48V “mild hybrid” capabilities; this will be available as a 1.5-litre (184hp) in the GLC 200, and 2.0-litre (254 hp) in the GLC 300. In the future, a plug-in hybrid version is also in the pipeline, using the hardware from the E 300e we tested last year, though whether this is Singapore-bound is still unknown. Naturally there will also be the AMG models, in 43 and 63 guise.

What: GLE

When: H1 2019

How Much: TBA

What the heck’s a GLE? Well it used to be the M-Class, aka ‘ML’, and is the car Merc fields against the X5 and Q7. But for the first time, it has the ability to seat seven, so no longer do buyers who want a seven-seat Merc have to spend $450k plus on a titanic GLS.  

It’s also smarter, thanks to its trick suspension setup that’s even more advanced than that found in the S-Class. Dubbed ‘E-Active Body Control’, spring and damping forces can supposedly be individually controlled at each wheel, which means is that it should be better at countering not just body roll but pitch and squat too. Party tricks include the ability to lean into corners so passengers feel less roll force, as well as quickly raising and lowering the suspension to rock the car free if it gets bogged down off-road.

The sole petrol variant at launch is the GLE 450, using the new mild hybrid 3.0 inline-six from the new CLS, although a GLC 300 or 350, using a 2.0-litre four-cylinder engine is highly likely, as is a super-hot V8 AMG version.

What: Mercedes-AMG GT 4-door Coupe

When: H2 2019

How much: TBA

Mercedes-Benz has one of, if not the most extensive model ranges of any car brand, which means overlaps in model lines are probably inevitable. This four-door version of the AMG GT super coupe is one such anomaly, as the company already has a large four-door coupe, the CLS. Despite adopting many styling cues from its racier two-door sibling though, the GT 4-door Coupe actually shares more under the skin with the CLS and E-Class.

Since it’s an AMG though, the GT 4-door Coupe packs more firepower than the CLS. The biggest gun is the familiar 4.0-litre AMG V8, available with 585hp (GT 63) or 638hp (GT 63 S); this engine will not be appearing in the CLS. The other two versions announced are the GT 53 and GT 43, which utilise the new 3.0-litre straight-six, tuned to 435hp and 367hp respectively. These two also feature EQ Boost mild hybrid tech, which gives short bursts of extra power and torque, while all versions have 4Matic all-wheel drive.


Mini

What: Clubman LCI (facelift)

How much: From S$150,000 with COE (estimated)

When: Q4 2019

Not much is on the plate for Mini in 2019, with just a facelift for the Clubman range on the cards (current model shown here). It should gain the Union Jack graphics on the tail-lamps of the Minis that were updated in 2018 (the hatch, five-door and convertible), with redesigned bumpers and mildly re-styled headlamps.

Mini is also planning to launch special edition models to keep interest in its cars going: a Countyman Dartmoor Edition could be the brand’s star at the Singapore Motorshow, and in the second quarter of the year there will be a Mini 60 Years Edition, designed to evoke warm, fuzzy feelings for the 1959 original.

There’s been talk (but no official word) about the Cooper S E Countryman, a plug-in hybrid electric version of Mini’s biggest car, a family friendly crossover. Roughly 40km of all-electric driving range is what it offers, probably around 30km if you’re a heavy air-con user. And aren’t we all?

McLaren

What: 720S Spider

When: 2019

How much: TBA

The 720S Coupe was one of the titans 2017, and serves to cement McLaren’s once-wobbly credentials in the supercar pantheon. The retractable hardtop takes just 11 seconds to open/close when deployed, with the car boasting drop-dead looks with the roof both up or down. The turbo’d 4.0-litre delivers a punchy 710hp and 770Nm, and the Spider will sprint to 100km/h from standstill in under 3.0 seconds. The Monocage II-S carbonfibre monocoque underpinning the Spider is so strong and rigid it wasn’t even necessary to strengthen the windscreen surround, and the Spider retains the Coupe’s elegant and ultra-slim A-pillars.

Nissan

What: Leaf

When: H1 2019

How much: TBA

The Nissan Leaf shouldn’t be too strange to Singaporeans, as there were a number of them running around the country, albeit under TIDES (Transport Technology Innovation and Development Scheme), a corporate test scheme to test the viability of EVs here. Now though, Nissan has turned over a new Leaf (hur hur) and the new second-generation car will be available for private consumers to buy. It now looks more conventional and less jelly bean-like, and has grown in size too. It’s also more powerful (147hp, up from 108), has an improved range of 270km (from 172km) and will potentially be able to do an 80-percent fast charge in 40 minutes. The Leaf flew the green flag high at the Singapore Motorshow 2019, along with the recently-confirmed Serena e-Power MPV. 

Peugeot

What: 3008 and 5008

When: Q2 2019

How much: TBA

There’s not much info available about what’s new with Peugeot’s award-winning crossover siblings, but the five-seater 3008 (shown here) and seven-seater 5008 look to be getting a power bump to the pricier 1.6-litre engine (+15hp, to 180hp), as well as a new eight-speed auto gearbox (previously a six-speeder). No word yet on whether the Cat A-friendly 1.2-litre engine will see similar changes.

What: 508 and 508 SW

When: Q4 2019

How much: TBA

The reigning popularity of SUVs means the market for large family saloons has declined significantly, but if there’s any car that could revive interest in the segment and stoke the flames of desire, it’s probably the new Peugeot 508. Looking more like a concept car than a family car, the 508 sports a coupe-like fastback shape (like the Kia Stinger and Mercedes CLS), expensive-looking LED lights, and even frameless windows, which are usually the preserve of proper sports cars. The interior is similarly fancy, with a split-level twin screen setup that’s heavily driver-centric.

Bucking industry trends, the car is smaller than its predecessor – about 80mm shorter and 51mm lower, as well as 70kg lighter, and it rides on the same EMP2 platform as the 3008. The sole engine choice for Singapore will be also be the 180hp 1.6-litre turbo. An equally handsome wagon version (the 508 SW) will also follow.

Porsche

What: Macan, Macan S (facelift)

When: Singapore Motorshow

How much: $250,088 and $288,788, without COE

Porsche’s baby of the range, the Macan sport utility vehicle (SUV), has been nothing but success for the brand in Singapore,  and now four years on it receives its first major update. The most obvious difference is the rear, which sees a new light bar style that spans the entire rear end – an approach that’s also seen on the Panamera, Cayenne, and new 911.

Inside, the Macan receives a tech boost in the form of Porsche’s new infotainment system, Porsche Connect Plus, and has a touchscreen upsize from 7.2 to 10.9-inches. The Macan base model has a 252hp 2.0-litre turbo inline four, the engines has been improved to deal with stricter emissions requirements around the world but with the same output.

The Macan S has a new 3.0-litre single-turbo, twin-scroll V6 with 354hp and 480Nm of torque – 14hp more than previous – this is the engine seen in the Cayenne, and also shared with Audi’s upper-range models.

Various chassis improvements include aluminium suspension spring forks replacing steel ones, new anti-roll bars, and new engine mounts. Don’t miss Carbuyer’s special report of the Macan at the Singapore Motorshow 2019! 

What: 911

When: TBA

How much: TBA

A new 911 is always a cause for celebration, and this is an all-new model that’s codenamed the 992. But just as we expect, Porsche rolls out a whole system-wide raft of improvements to sharpen the most famous sports car in the world – in classic 911 fashion, it’s a mass of small tweaks to every aspect of the machine, rather than a handful of big ones.

The new cars are all wide-bodied – that is the standard models will have the wider bodyshell seen on GT and Turbo Porsches, all the better since the wide hips accentuate the cleaner rear end styling – with the now brand-wide lightbar of course.

Porsche has unveiled official figures for the Carrera S (rear-wheel drive) and Carrera 4S, Improvements to the existing 3.0-litre flat six turbocharged engine means both models now have 30hp more, for a 450hp total, with 530Nm of torque. For the Carrera S, that makes a 0-100km/h time of 3.7 seconds (3.5 seconds in Sport Plus with Chrono Pack) and a 308km/h top speed.

Renault

What: Alpine A110

When: Singapore Motorshow 2019

How much:

Two seats, engine in the middle, snappy dual-clutch gearbox, and an obsessive approach to engineering: you’d normally use these terms to describe something like a Porsche, but now, they’re equally apt for a little new sports car from France. The A110 marks the revival of Alpine (pronounced Al-peen), a Renault-owned racing and sports car brand famous for its rear-engined coupes from the 1950s to the 1990s.

Styled and named after the original A110 from 1962 (the first car to win the World Rally Championship), the modern A110 rivals the Porsche Cayman, packing a 252hp from a 1.8-litre turbo. Despite the modest figure, it’ll still do 0-100km/h in just 4.5 seconds, thanks to aluminium construction and painstakingly detailed weight saving too numerous to list here; total weight for the car stands at 1100kg, a whopping 300kg less than the Cayman.

What: Kadjar facelift
When: Q1 2019

How Much: TBA

After an absence of just over a year, Renault’s compact crossover offering is coming back to Singapore in updated form. You’d have a hard time telling the difference visually, but welcome changes have been made elsewhere. The interior has been modernised, with a larger touchscreen and aircon controls with inset digital readouts, à la Jaguars and Land Rovers, while under the bonnet sits the new 138hp 1.3-litre engine from the Mercedes B 180, which is the product of a developmental tie-up between the Renault-Nissan Alliance and Daimler AG.

Seat

What: Cupra Ateca

When: Q2 2019

How much: TBA

First thing’s first, this isn’t a Seat. It may look like a meaner version of Seat’s compact crossover, the Ateca (well, in actual fact it is), but it’s not a Seat. For marketing reasons we don’t quite understand, Cupra – Seat’s motorsports division and the moniker applied to all hot Seats till now – has now been spun off into its own brand. So what we have here is the “Cupra Ateca”, not “Seat Ateca Cupra”.

Anyway, it’s a curious little thing, in that it’s pretty much the only non-luxury sports SUV available right now. Otherwise, the car itself follows a straightforward go-faster recipe: same 2.0-litre engine as the Golf R, 300hp, four-wheel drive, 0-100km/h in 5.2 seconds, 247km/h top speed. That’s all wrapped up with aggressive bumpers, 19-inch wheels, quad tailpipes, bucket seats, and the new copper-coloured Cupra logos.

What: Tarraco

When: Q3 2019

How much:TBA

Say hello to the biggest, poshest Seat thus far. The Tarraco is a large seven-seater SUV, basically a re-skinned version of another practical Volkswagen-based family SUV, the Skoda Kodiaq. As is the case with most Volkswagen Group products, the Tarraco makes extensive use of the corporate parts bin – expect drivetrains seen in other VW Group cars, like the 150hp 1.5-litre TSI Evo engine from the recently launched Skoda Karoq, to the familiar 2.0-litre engine found in the 4×4 version of the Kodiaq. Inside, the optional digital instrument cluster has graphics similar to the new BMW X5 and Z4, while the Tarraco’s exterior style is a hint of future Seats to come.

Suzuki

What: S-Cross facelift

When: Singapore Motorshow 2019

How much: From $99,900 with COE

Crossover craziness is so prevalent these days that it’s even starting to influence traditional car body styles. Case in point, the new Suzuki S-Cross, which is err, a cross between a crossover and a regular family hatchback – sort of like the Nissan Qashqai. The massive new chrome front grille looks challenging, to say the least, but otherwise the car is roomy and practical. It should be nicer to drive too, as the old 1.6-litre engine and CVT combo get replaced by turbo power. Pricing and more details in our Singapore Motorshow 2019 crossover coverage here. 

What: Jimny

When: Q2 2019

How much: TBA

The diminutive Jimny is perhaps the global car industry’s most surprising smash hit of 2018. Demand for the four-wheeled Lego brick has been so strong that in Japan, Suzuki apparently managed to fill a years’ worth of orders in just a month. Naturally, demand far outstrips supply, although the company intends to increase production this year.

When it does finally arrive though, this is what customers can look forward to: a naturally-aspirated 1.5-litre four-cylinder with 102hp, mated to either a five-speed manual or four-speed auto, solid axles with selectable four-wheel drive (with low-range gearbox), and an adorably retro style. There’s not much in terms of creature comforts, but then the refreshing simplicity is part of the Jimny’s charm, and it’s pretty much the only compact SUV that looks damn cool but has the offroad chops to back it all up.

Toyota

What: Corolla Altis

When: Q4 2019

How much: Around S$90,000 with COE (estimated)

For Toyota a new Corolla is always big news, and maybe that’s why the Japanese giant launched two of them in November: a posher-looking Prestige version that’s headed for Europe and China, as well as a Sporty version for North America, Japan, China (where it’s called the Levin) and, we hear, Singapore.

Anyone who’s called a Corolla Altis boring should take a look. The new car’s slim lights and large lower grille make it sharper and more aggressive looking than ever, as do its new proportions (it’s marginally longer and wider, but 45mm lower).

It’s built on the Toyota New Global Architecture C platform that underpins the Prius, and should offer tauter handling than before with a well-controlled ride. Expect an improvement in overall refinement, thanks to greater use of sound-absorbing material.

The cabin has a cleaner look than before, with a large touchscreen taking centreplace.

A 1.6-litre engine with 130 horsepower, paired with a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT) that has 10 pre-set speeds to mimic close-ratio gearbox, are what we expect under the bonnet.

A curveball would be the appearance of a Corolla Hybrid, which has a 121hp, 1.8-litre petrol-electric setup that should return around 4.7L/100km. Could it happen? Yes. Just not that soon. The Corolla itself might not even arrive by 2019’s end, and could very well be a 2020 car for Singapore.

What: Camry

When: January 2019

How much: From S$141,800 with COE

The all-new Camry debuted at Singapore Motorshow, and the radical looks of the eight-generation model ought to forever put an end to its image as a stately uncle’s car.

The new model rides on an all-new platform (TNGA) that should be tuned for the impeccable refinement that’s expected of this large sedan, most likely with sharper handling. What’s particularly important for this model is that the wheelbase has grown by a whopping 50mm, which should help to turn an already spacious car into a palatial one.

The Hybrid model is pictured here but we’ll be getting 2.0 and 2.5 models, with major changes afoot for the latter. The 2.0-litre engine is a carryover, meaning it’s a 164hp unit paired with a six-speed auto, but the 2.5-litre is a new engine with 40 percent thermal efficiency (most engines only convert a third of their energy to useful work). It sends 209 horsepower to the front wheels through a new eight-speed auto.

The Camry 2.5 will also be offered with the Toyota Safety Sense suite of driver assistance systems, including autonomous emergency braking, lane departure alert, lane keeping assist and adaptive cruise control.

What: Prius (facelift)

When: TBA

How much: S$145,000 with COE

For 2019 Toyota is toning down the radical looks of the Prius. The facelifted model is easily identified by slim front headlamps that no longer stretch down into the front bumper, and more conventional tail lamps that no longer have a lightning bolt motif.

Other markets get a new all-wheel drive version (Toyota expects it to account for a quarter of sales in the US), but we’re sticking with front-drive. That doesn’t mean the Prius is completely the same under the bonnet, however. FWD models are getting a denser lithium-ion battery pack, finally moving away from the current nickel metal hydride design.

What: RAV4

When: Singapore Motorshow 2019

How much: from S$120,000 with COE

Another new car built on TNGA architecture made debut at the Singapore Motorshow, in the form of the revamped RAV4. We’re expecting a 2.0-litre front-wheel drive layout, with 173hp under the bonnet and a Continuously Variable Transmission.

Compared to the last model, the wheelbase has grown 30mm (to 2,690mm), which should make for a roomier cabin. The new RAV4 is also slightly (10mm) lower and shorter (5mm), with a 10mm gain in width.

It’s a more imposing looking car, and Toyota says it’s more capable off-road than before, thanks to new driving modes such as “mud and sand” and “rock and dirt”.

The ongoing boom in crossover cars should give the RAV4 a decent shot at strong sales numbers.

What: Supra

When: Q4 2019

How much: TBA

Breaking news: The production model Supra has been confirmed as reported here. 

This is a car Toyota has been working on since 2012, more than twice as long as it takes to engineer a regular model. Despite the long gestation, the highly-anticipated new Supra hasn’t been shown in production form yet — chief engineer Tetsuya Tada says he wants it perfect first.

That said, a couple of things are known about Toyota’s top end sportscar: every Supra has had a straight six cylinder engine and rear-wheel drive, so the fifth one will, too. It has a lower centre of gravity than the GT86, a shorter wheelbase and a bodyshell twice as stiff, all of which suggests it will be incredibly agile but planted.

The new Supra is also a sister car to the BMW Z4 (Toyota and BMW joined forces to develop them), so a turbo six from BMW with 335 horsepower and an eight-speed auto from ZF sound like the likely powertrain. There are whispers of a four-cylinder model (perhaps from the BMW 330i) for an entry-level version, but we reckon even that will cost more than S$200,000 with COE.

The speculation ends in January when the Supra makes its global debut at the Detroit auto show, and it should make its way here by the fourth quarter of 2019.

Volkswagen

What: Touareg

When: 1H 2019

How Much: TBA

VW’s poshest car is the Touareg, now that the ill-fated Phaeton has become a phantom (not Phantom) and in its third-gen, with premium underpinnings (a platform shared with the Porsche Panamera and Bentley Bentayga) emerges as a serious contender to the BMW X5, Mercedes-Benz GLE, and Audi Q7. A 340hp 3.0-litre V6 (as seen in Audi and Porsche models) is the most likely bet for us.

The interior features VW’s linear, clean design language and huge amounts of room, as well as a touchscreen infotainment system that has a screen bigger than many laptops’. For those who’ve wanted big German SUV luxury experience for a less staggering price, the Touareg could very well hit the sweet spot.  If you’re wondering what it’s like, Ju-Len has driven it overseas and already made a terrible pun on its name with his first drive review.

Volvo

What: S60/V60

When: End 2019-early 2020

How much: TBA

Volvo’s current S60 is one of the few reminders of the bad ole’ Ford days, and is longer in the tooth than a sabretooth tiger. But the new S60 represents many good, new things for Volvo – like the S90 it uses the SPA architecture and new-gen engines. A 400hp T8 plug-in hybrid and twincharged 340hp T6 has been announced, but don’t make any bets on those coming to Singapore.

For us, the T5 and T4 variants are confirmed, both with 2.0-litre turbo engines, packing 250hp and 190hp respectively. Again like its big brother the S90, there will be a station wagon version in the form of the V60, and naturally it looks much sexier than the sedan does.

The S60 popped up at Suntec in early January for a preview, and we thought it looked rather fetching so much so we rated it one of the sedans to keep an eye out for at the show. 

What: XC40 T3

When: TBA

How Much: TBA

Thus far, Volvo’s new-gen cars have been offered only with a 2.0-litre inline four engine in varying power outputs (T4 to T6), but the XC40 small SUV is now Volvo’s biggest seller in Singapore ̶a̶n̶d̶ ̶l̶o̶o̶k̶s̶ ̶t̶o̶ ̶b̶o̶o̶s̶t̶ ̶t̶h̶a̶t̶ ̶e̶v̶e̶n̶ ̶m̶o̶r̶e̶ ̶w̶i̶t̶h̶ ̶a̶ ̶1̶.̶5̶-̶l̶i̶t̶r̶e̶,̶ ̶t̶h̶r̶e̶e̶-̶c̶y̶l̶i̶n̶d̶e̶r̶ ̶T̶3̶ ̶m̶o̶d̶e̶l̶ ̶w̶i̶t̶h̶ ̶1̶5̶0̶h̶p̶. ̶ which will remain as is, but if you read about the T3 model on CarBuyer bug them about it and they might change their mind.

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