2021 Kia Cerato GT Line Review: Waxing Lyrical





1.Introduction
2.Design and Appearance
3.Interior and Features
4.Space, Practicality and Safety
5.Driving Experience
6.Competitors and Conclusion

5. Driving Experience

Given the technology and almost totally new front end design, it’s a small disappointment that the car still packs the same 1.6-litre, non-turbo, non-hybrid inline four as before. Compare the Stonic small SUV, which now packs mild hybrid tech, when on paper it should be a less advanced model.

With 128hp, it racks up respectable, if totally predictable, performance.  Our test car was all box-fresh with less than 20km on the clock, so the 1.6-litre sounded a little thrummy at low revs, but this eased up as we racked up the miles. We also tested the previous Cerato GT Line with more than 5,000km on the odo, and it felt significantly smoother, so we expect the new Cerato to behave identically.

Otherwise, it delivers the familiar Cerato experience: The drivetrain won’t set your world on fire, but it’s smooth and predictable, if a little lacking oomph in this age of hybrid-assisted torque.

In terms of ride and handling, it’s surprisingly sporty which means little roll in corners and a responsive nose. The downside of that is busy ride quality, with complex sections of bumps and multiple corners unsettling the rear a little. For those who want a comfy ride, we recommend the EX model, which has 16-inch wheels.

But speaking of comfy, the Cerato is also one of the more refined cars at this price range. There’s a little tyre road, but otherwise the cabin is pleasantly quiet even at highway speed, with comfort pluses like the air-con seats and adaptive cruise control improving the experience further.  


Over 200km we clocked 7.2L/100km on the Normal drive mode (there’s also Eco and Sport), which is well within expectations for a 1.6-litre sedan like this. In the VES lottery, it scores a B, which is the very least a mainstream car should shoot for in this age.

How does the Cerato stack up:?
6. Competitors and conclusion


1.Introduction
2.Design and Appearance
3.Interior and Features
4.Space, Practicality and Safety
5.Driving Experience
6.Competitors and Conclusion

about the author

Derryn Wong
CarBuyer's chief editor has a keen interest in all things mechanical, technological, animal and mineral. He's particularly fascinated by eco-cars and cars which make no logical sense. An avid motorcyclist and photographer, he also enjoys cats. Follow him on Instagram @werryndong