2021 Toyota GR Yaris Review: Special, Kay?



1.Introduction
2.Design and appearance
3.Interior and features
4.Driving experience
5.Conclusion

3. Interior and features

2021 Toyota GR Yaris cockpit view

If you want to fault the GR Yaris, here’s where you can: This is obviously not the cabin of a normal S$200k car. The cockpit has the same general layout as the Yaris Cross, with the switchgear, cupholders, and cubby spaces remaining the same.

2021 Toyota GR Yaris interior side view



There’s less space all around though, what with the sport seats, lower roof, and three-door body shape. Besides the open shelf on the centre console, the cup-holders are tiny, and there’s really not much space to stow your knick-knacks – this becomes important later on. 

It’s mainstream Toyota stuff, and what we would expect from a sub-S$90k compact hatch: lots of plastics and sturdy but uninspiring design, aside from the ‘GR’ badges, the manual gearbox, and the red-trimmed leather sections. 

Hot hatch or no, Toyota didn’t leave out active safety – there’s forward collision warning/mitigation, lane keeping, and adaptive cruise control, though no blind spot monitoring. 


In spec terms, Singapore’s GR Yaris-es come with the overseas ‘Track Pack’ as standard, slapping on Torsen LSD on both axles, 18-inch BBS forged wheels, higher-performance suspension, a HUD, and flat underbody for better aero.

You can see how the double-wishbone suspension eats into boot space

Behind, there’s only room for two people, and the tiny 174-litre boot (compare the normal Yaris at 286-litres) can fit a week’s worth of shopping – and strap the eggs down lest they become scrambled. Even if you flip the seats down, don’t even think about cramming a normal bicycle back there. 

But you don’t buy a car like this to look downwards. It’s a compact car interior, but once you start the car up you know where all the money went.

Page 4: Open up and say ‘GRRRR’ – driving the GR Yaris

about the author

Derryn Wong
CarBuyer's chief editor has a keen interest in all things mechanical, technological, animal and mineral. He's particularly fascinated by eco-cars and cars which make no logical sense. An avid motorcyclist and photographer, he also enjoys cats. Follow him on Instagram @werryndong