2021 Triumph Tiger 900 GT Review: Not Just New Stripes



Back to Page 1: Intro and what’s new on the Tiger 900


The more powerful three-cylinder engine is certainly responsible for that too, the new 900cc unit is Euro V compliant, producing 10 percent more torque (87Nm at 7,250rpm) and nine percent more power in the mid-range rpm, but with the same peak power of 94hp at 8,750rpm.

That translates to more power and better acceleration all-round, and is enjoyably punchy. The Tiger 900’s engine pulls really hard from 4,000 to 4,800rpm, tapers, then picks up again from 5200rpm to 7000rpm, even in sixth. The fly-by-wire throttle is seamless, reducing the usual lurching when rolling-off and getting on the throttle again immediately.

On the downside, there was some buzziness from the engine, especially above 6,000rpm, possibly a result of the new firing order, which also makes the bike sound more like a parallel twin than the much-loved Triumph triple burble/whine. 

What I found unusual was buzziness in the engine, particularly above 6000rpm, apparently a result of the new 1,3,2 firing order, a departure from the 120 degree configuration from the earlier engines. Aurally, the Tiger 900 sounds more like a Yamaha TDM with its 270 degree parallel twin, i.e. sounding more “twin” like than the classic Triumph “triple” exhaust note. Even the characteristic high pitch whine is now muted. 

It was happy leaning to a considerable 40+ degrees, at which point the adventure-sized 19-inch front wheel would require more, perhaps excessive, handlebar input to increase lean angle. Tackling sweepers spiritedly would also cause a bit of rear wheel bobbing (evident by tyre wear), a characteristic of softly-sprung adventure bikes, but we were able to mitigate that by increasing the preload a few clicks.



As for non-spirited daily riding, the Triumph’s broad power band, agile handling, and low seat make easy work of the urban jungle, and without panniers the bike’s not particularly broad either. The GT Low doesn’t have an up-down quickshifter, available as an option, and standard on the GT Pro and Rally Pro. We did notice that there was some heat directed at the right knee, though if you don’t wear shorts, nor spend 15 minutes on end in traffic it shouldn’t be a problem.   



Like any self-respecting Euro adventure bike now, the Tiger’s brimming with technology on all fronts, and it is quite well-specced. 

On the safety front, Brembo Stylema front brakes deliver good power and feel, even with one finger, and that’s helped along by riding modes (Rain, Road, Sport, Off-Road) and a new optimized cornering ABS and traction control, with IMU (inertia measurement unit).


The Tiger 900 now sports a 7.0-inch TFT display for a dashboard, which apart from having four layout styles to choose from, also includes a half screen Turn-by-Turn navigation, which requires option hardware, and operation via the My Triumph app.



Triumph has clearly thought this through, since a waterproof handphone compartment complete with charging capability is provided under the passenger seat. Additionally, the battery is now accessible under the rider’s seat by simple removal of a plastic shroud.

Underseat phone charger is a nifty feature

In competition, the BMW F 850 GS and Ducati Multistrada 950 are the closest, with a similar size, spec, though you pay more for the premium badge of course. Like Triumph always does, the Tiger 900 offers lots of bang for the buck in comparison. 

If we were in the market for an adventure bike agile enough for daily commute, long tank range (each fill up is good for 350km), characterful engine and exhaust note, at a price tag reflective of the world economy, the Tiger 900 would be on that short-list without a doubt. 

Triumph Tiger 900 GT 

Engine888cc, inline 3
Power94hp at 8750rpm
Torque87Nm at 7250rpm
Gearbox6-speed manual 
0-100km/hNot quoted 
Top SpeedNot quoted
Wet Weight198kg 
Seat Height 760-780mm
AgentMah Motors
Price S$29,419.05 machine price
AvailabilityNow
Verdict Feature-packed, well rounded middle-weight adventure bike that handles like its highly regarded brethren, now accessible to a wider audience.

about the author

Deyna Chia
Deyna Chia
Deyna 'DC' Chia is a long-time contributor to CarBuyer. A founding member of the driving enthusiasts' club, The Traction Circle, he's also the resident speed freak on two-wheels, being an accomplished motorcyclist and trackday rider. Despite the rumour that 'DC' stands for 'does crack', he does not actually consume crack.