Facelifted Hyundai Ioniq Hybrid and Electric go on sale in Singapore



2020 update brings new looks, new interior, and extra tech. Priced at S$108k and S$157k respectively with COE

SINGAPORE

Green motoring in Singapore just got more affordable, thanks to Hyundai. Its facelifted Ioniq Hybrid is now Singapore’s cheapest full hybrid car, at S$107,999 with Certificate of Entitlement.

This is thanks to a slight reduction to power, which has enabled the Ioniq Hybrid to be reclassified as a Cat A COE car, just like its corporate cousin, the Kia Niro. Outputs are now 130hp and 265Nm, compared to 140hp and 265Nm when the car first launched at the end of 2016. 

Fuel consumption is rated at 3.8L/100km (compared to the Niro’s 4.0L/100km), and its VES rating is A2. 

The Ioniq Electric, conversely, has been moved up into Cat B, and it’ll cost you S$156,999 with COE to put your name down for one. That’s because its battery is now more energy-dense at 38.3kWh (up from 28kWh, or 36 percent more capacity), which gives it not only extra power (+14hp, now at 134hp), but crucially, extra range too (+68km, now 311km). 

You get more safety tech for your money, too. The Ioniq Electric in Singapore now comes with a suite of active safety systems dubbed Hyundai SmartSense. This includes forward collision avoidance, adaptive cruise control with stop & go function, lane keep assist, blind spot warning and rear cross traffic alert.

Common to the two cars are its exterior and interior changes. Both get new wheels, new front grilles, and LED headlights, taillights, and daytime running lights.

Inside, the dashboard has been completely redesigned, with a digital touchscreen climate control panel, and a larger, free-standing infotainment screen. 

The 2020 Hyundai Ioniq pair will officially be unveiled to the public at the 2020 Singapore Motorshow on 9 to 12 January.

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Jon Lim
CarBuyer's latest addition is its fourth historical Jonathan. Old-fashioned in all but body, he thinks car design peaked in the '90s. He also strongly believes any car can be a race car if you have a sufficient lack of self-preservation, which explains why he nearly flipped a Chinese van while racing it.