Cycle & Carriage opens new Mitsubishi Showroom in Singapore



Bigger and airier than before, it’s all a part of Mitsubishi’s new worldwide corporate identity

SINGAPORE

Cycle & Carriage’s Mitsubishi showroom at 239 Alexandra Road has just opened its doors once again yesterday, on July 29, 2019.

Costing approximately S$400,000, the revamp brings Singapore’s sole official Mitsubishi showroom in line with a new global corporate identity that was announced last year, with a black, white and grey colour scheme and red accents.

Not only does the new decor make for a more distinctive appearance, but the showroom space itself has also been enlarged, with a new lounge area for customers to wait while their cars are being serviced. 

“This new corporate identity is intended to provide a better customer experience, strengthen Mitsubishi Motors’ brand image, and ensure a consistent and coherent experience for all who interact with us and the brand,” said Eric Chan (below), Managing Director – Direct Motor Interest for Jardine Cycle & Carriage, said at the unveiling.

The re-opening was commemorated with Taiko drum and lion dance performances, as well as a Kagami Biraki ceremony, wherein the lid of a barrel of sake is broken with a wooden mallet, to bring in good fortune.

An Outlander art car was also on display, featuring hand-drawn doodles depicting various Singaporean landmarks alongside Mitsubishi’s most iconic and significant models.

Apart from being able to enjoy the new digs, Mitsubishi customers can also look forward to a host of activities, including movie nights, coffee or sake appreciation, and an island-wide treasure hunt.

That’s in addition to Cycle & Carriage’s ongoing 120th anniversary competition, where customers stand to win a specially curated trip to Mongolia, Nepal or South Korea.

“The opening of this revamped showroom is timely as C&C celebrates its 120th birthday this year,” remarked Mr Chan. “The next lap for Mitsubishi starts here.”

about the author

avatar
Jon Lim
CarBuyer's latest addition is its fourth historical Jonathan. Old-fashioned in all but body, he thinks car design peaked in the '90s. He also strongly believes any car can be a race car if you have a sufficient lack of self-preservation, which explains why he nearly flipped a Chinese van while racing it.