Triumph revamps the Bonneville lineup for 2021



Triumph Bonneville Bobber

Five new models announced  – T120, T120 Black, T100, Street Twin, Speedmaster, Bobber – due Singapore in May 2021


Hinckley, England –
Triumph’s has announced its revamped Bonneville family line-up for 2021. 

The bike family retains the essential frame/chassis but overall owners can expect improvements with a new Euro V compliant engine with more power and responsiveness, styling updates, and additions to electronics such as additional riding modes.

With over 367,000 Bonnevilles sold since 2001, the classic lineup is a mainstay of the modern Triumph brand, the company saying that the Bonneville has now been evolved, receiving improvements in performance and handling, and enhanced features, style and detailing, while retaining the styling DNA modern-classic customers expect .

Six models have been announced by Triumph, and we can expect the first bikes to make landfall here in Singapore in May 2021 from official dealer Mah Motors. Triumph adds that this Bonneville line-up will be enhanced further still in April 2021, with the official reveal of the new generation Scrambler 1200 and Street Scrambler, when full details will be released.

The six models are ( pictured above from left to right)
– the classic Bonneville T120
– the murdered-out edition of that, the T120 Black
– the entry level Bonneville T100
– the modern-styled Street Twin / limited edition Street Twin Gold Line
– the Bonneville Speedmaster cruiser
– the Bonneville Bobber chopper/custom

Bobber, Speedmaster, T120, T100…whut?!? Which model to choose? 

Like other bike makers with a modern classic lineup, there are many models that look similar at first glance but each has their own target audience. 

Triumph Street Twin

In the case of the Bonneville family, Triumph says it’s best seller is the Street Twin, its youthful and contemporary styling representing a good introduction to Truimph’s classic bike range. 

The T120/T100 are more classic in styling, faithful to original Bonneville from the 1950s and 1960s.


Whilst appealing to a broad range of people, (younger) riders usually choose the Street Twin and T100 as their first big bike. The T120, Bobber and Speedmaster appeal to people coming back to riding motorbikes. 

Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

The Bobber, with its hard-tail styling, has seen strong success on the showroom floor. The fat front wheel is a result of Triumph listening to the Customer, and Triumph intends to continue developing the Bobber moving forward. Similar to the Bobber attitude, the SpeedMaster is positioned for customers who want to tour, and requiring pillion provision.

Triumph also says its new 2021 range offer a lower cost of ownership (16,000km service intervals), and up to two-year warranty from the factory. Triumph has done extensive research, and found that 86 percent of Bonneville owners personalise their bikes – so it’ll offer 320 official accessories for the range.  

Bonneville T120 and T120 Black
What is it: Classic British twin style with modern underpinnings

Triumph Bonneville T120


The heart of the updated Bonneville range is an update to the 1,200cc parallel twin engine. It’s now Euro V compliant, and Triumph claims it’s more fuel efficient with lower emissions, and notably more responsive to throttle inputs, with less inertia.

Triumph Bonneville T120



The improved engine response has been achieved because of its lighter crankshaft, and inertia reducing optimised clutch and balancer shafts. The 1200 twin engine delivers a decent 105 Nm of peak torque at a very low 3,500 rpm and its power peaks 80hp at 6,550 rpm.

The 2021 T120s are now 7kg lighter, courtesy of new lightweight aluminium wheel rims. Improvements include higher specification Brembo brakes (twin disc, two piston front setup), cruise control (standard on the T120s), enhanced riding modes, ABS and traction control.  

There’s a new LED daytime running light, and behind that the T120s twin clock set-up have a new ‘premium 3D dial face’ with Bonneville branding and traditional typeface and colours. 



The multi-functional digital display provides the rider quite  abit of information, such as riding mode settings, cruise control status, gear position indicator, something other modern classics often lack. 

The Bonneville T120 Black, as the name suggests, goes big on the dark stuff: It’s  styled with blacked-out details and components, including wheel rims, grab rail, engine covers, mirrors, headlamp bezel, indicators, and exhaust, plus a stylish brown bench seat with embossed Triumph logo.

2021 Bonneville T100
What is it: See above, but with a 900cc engine and smaller price tag

Triumph Bonneville T100


Like the T120, the bike is lighter, has a new engine, and small spec updates. 

The 900cc parallel-twin engine is also Euro V compliant, but has also been updated to result  in a lighter and more responsive powertrain. Revving 500rpm higher, peak power is 10hp higher (65hp at 7,400 rpm), peak torque (80NM at 3,750 rpm), with 80 percent of peak torque available all the way from 2000 rpm to 7000rpm. Improvements to engine performance result from the low inertia crankshaft, lighter balancer shafts, a thin walled clutch cover and a magnesium cam cover.

Improvements to the T100 include higher specification Brembo two-piston front brake, latest generation ABS, switchable traction control and higher specification cartridge front forks, and a new instrument dial face with integrated, multi-function display.


2021 Street Twin
What is it: Triumph’s ‘retro-modern’ bike with less classic baggage

Triumph Street Twin


While the T100 is the entry to the classic range, the Street Twin is a little more of a contemporary, generalist bike, and is an alternative for a rider who would otherwise choose a more modern bike – you can see that from the style of the tank, which doesn’t have the Bonneville signature tank pads.

The formula has worked though, as the Street Twin has been the best-selling bike in the Bonneville range with over 30,000 units sold since its introduction in 2016.


The Euro-5 compliant 900cc twin has 65PS peak power arriving at 7,500 rpm (100rpm higher than the T100) and with 80Nm peak torque at 3,800 rpm, accessed by a ride-by-wire throttle. 

On the body, there’s new cast wheels (with Pirelli Phantom Sportscomp tyres), bench seat (10mm thicker, with 765mm seat height), bodywork compact headlamp and LED tail light. 

Also found as standard features are ABS, Switchable Traction Control and two riding modes are available – Rain and Road.

Triumph Street Twin Gold Line

Additionally there’s a Street Twin Gold Line limited edition, with 1,000 made, available only in Matt Sapphire Black with gold highlights. Showcasing the pin-striping skills of Triumph’s paint shop, each comes with a certificate of authenticity personalised with the unique VIN number of the bike.


2021 Bonneville Speedmaster
What is it: The Bonneville in low, relaxed cruiser style

Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster


The Speedmaster has the updated 1,200cc engine found on the T120, albeit with different tuning to suit the cruiser character: It has lower peak power and slightly more torque with a fatter torque curve:, 78hp and peak torque of 106Nm at just 3,850rpm, with over 90 percent of the torque available up to 5,750rpm.

The exhaust system has larger end cans and Triumph says it’s designed to make a richer, more distinctive sound, and it has a hidden catalyst so the pipes appear to run straight. 

Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster

New bigger diameter 47mm Showa cartridge forks and preload-adjustable hidden monoshock rear suspension unit ensure the Speedmaster maintains good road manners.

The seat configuration can be easily switched between a twin or single seat set up, which allows fitment of the accessory rear rack. The Speedmaster’s lighting is now full LED, including headlight, rear light, indicators and number plate light.


2021 Bonneville Bobber
What is it: The custom chop-shop style Bonneville 

Bonneville Bobber

The 2021 Bobber sports a updated blacked-out 1,200cc engine (106Nm at 4,000rpm; 78ps at 6,100rpm), black rims, 16-in fat front wheel and chunkier 47mm forks, and 33 percent more range from its larger 12-litre tank. 

As before, the ‘floating’ aluminium seat gives the Bobber that cleaner, distinctive hard-tail look. The low seat height of 690mm has an interesting twist: You can adjust it, like a car seat (fore and aft, up and down) to suit you. 

Bonneville Bobber



Lighting is full LED, inclusive of bullet indicators and a new headlight. For 2021 the instruments feature a new bezel and dial face, with translucent silver markings.


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Deyna Chia
Deyna 'DC' Chia is a long-time contributor to CarBuyer. A founding member of the driving enthusiasts' club, The Traction Circle, he's also the resident speed freak on two-wheels, being an accomplished motorcyclist and trackday rider. Despite the rumour that 'DC' stands for 'does crack', he does not actually consume crack.