Lexus unveils its first electric car, the UX300e



400km of range, 300Nm of torque, but no indication of Singapore launch yet

Guangzhou, China

As the first mover in the hybrid luxury car business, you might think that Lexus would be a big player in fossil fuel-less propulsion by now. But no; its first fully electric vehicle (EV), the UX300e, has only just debuted, 14 years after the RX400h stole a march on competitors.

Unveiled at the Guangzhou International Automobile Exhibition, the UX300e is based on the UX small crossover that we drove earlier this year. 

In place of the 2.0-litre four-cylinder found in the existing UX200 and UX250h, the UX300e features a single electric motor under the bonnet. Powering the front wheels, it produces 150kW (200hp) and 300Nm of torque. 



Fed by a 54.3kWh battery pack located under the car, Lexus claims a maximum range of 400km. Like on the Hyundai Ioniq Electric and Kia Niro EV, this can be managed slightly with four different levels of regenerative braking, controlled via paddle shifters behind the steering wheel.

Other tweaks include suspension tweaks to cope with the different weight and weight distribution of the EV drivetrain, and perversely (despite the characteristic silence of EVs), extra noise insulation, to suppress wind and road noise that would otherwise have been masked by the engine.



As far as aesthetics go, the UX300e is identical to other UX models, save for “Electric” and “300e” badging around the car. Do note though, that the UX300e’s ground clearance is reduced by 20mm due to the batteries.

2019.10.29

For now, the UX300e has only been confirmed for sale in the Chinese and European markets in 2020, and in Japan and the UK in 2021. No information is available about a Singaporean launch.

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Jon Lim
CarBuyer's latest addition is its fourth historical Jonathan. Old-fashioned in all but body, he thinks car design peaked in the '90s. He also strongly believes any car can be a race car if you have a sufficient lack of self-preservation, which explains why he nearly flipped a Chinese van while racing it.